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Bootleg Beck Interview Part TWO

17 Aug, 2022 | Return|

Go to this page to HEAR CASSETTE RECORDING OF ACTUAL INTERVIEW

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vae2HwDC9xc

FULL TRANSCRIPT OF INTERVIEW BELOW

  It’s April 7, 1994 and a young Beck Hansen is playing “Wildwood Flower” and other folk tunes on my guitar in the back of a 60’s VW Bus parked outside Bernie’s Bagels in Columbus, Ohio with Joe Ciriello (who played washboard with Beck later that night) and I interviewing him. There are silly moments here and there are also some candid moments from a young artist who is about to become very, very famous. There is much discussion of the local Columbus music scene plus notions of keeping total artistic control when signing the big record deal, and a funny invitation from David Lee Roth. The next day we would all find out that Kurt Cobain killed himself. All ye wanna be rock stars take note of how this artist respects the heroes of his heroes and can play Carter Family tunes on the guitar.

JC:

Kids are coming as far as Indianapolis for this Bernie’s gig.

Beck:

I feel bad. It’s only happened the last week and a half. The first shows, they were all sold out and packed, but now they're just getting crazy. People getting all riled up about nothing.

TE:

Oh, it's after that sex change you had, they just decided that they needed the next big thing. You know?

Beck:

Yeah. Once I became the transsexual waif, they sort of all threw their hands in the air.

TE:

Certainly.

Beck:

Started melting all their Pearl Jam CDs.

TE:

Kind of coughed up a lava bed of love.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

For your way.

Beck:

I know. But I did play Wildwood Flower last night, and there was 200 kids moshing to Wildwood Flower. (starts to play Wildwood Flower) I went... and they were going crazy. They were flying through the air like Pearl Jam. I'm like, "I hope you know your great-great-great-grandparents were probably listening to that."

TE:

You can only hope. Can only hope.

Beck:

It's kind of perverse in a way.

 

JC:

Have you had any negative reactions [inaudible]? People don't know what to expect from you? I mean, some people come out, expect you to be all hip hop or whatever.

 

Beck:

Yeah. That's been happening for years, even when they didn't know who the fuck I was.

JC:

Well, yeah, but I mean people expect something now.

Beck:

They're, "Get off the stage, Bob Dylan."

TE:

What happened up at the Viper Room? They invited you up-

Beck:

Oh, I said I would not play there. This is before I got a record deal, so I was pretty strapped for cash. And they said, "Well, we'll give you $300."

Beck:

I said, "Okay, if you want." So I go down there with just a banjo and played a couple songs, and then all the fashion models and spokespeople and stuff were all sitting there drinking their-

TE:

Aperitifs and cocktails.

Beck:

Yeah. Bottled water. And their sparkly-

TE:

Spritzer hells.

Beck:

... spritzers and bubblies. And not even looking at me, talking as loud as they could. Nobody was watching me. And then after about four songs they closed the curtain on me.

TE:

They got a curtain?

Beck:

And I just gave them a big finger.

Beck:

Can sing, dance, aerobicise and [inaudible]. And then my friend Steve went out, "Hi, I'm an aspiring actress." He had the headshot taped to his crotch. "I can model. I can do jazz dancing and aerobics. I'm looking for a part in a movie."

TE:

Jesus.

Beck:

Nobody got it. But then they threw me out.

TE:

Of course not. Are you going to play any banjo tonight?

Beck:

I don't have a banjo. I never had a banjo. I only get to play banjo when somebody else has one. But I want to get one.

TE:

Got to rustle one up.

Beck:

I'm crazy to get one.

TE:

They make a lot of noise, you know? Don't need your mic…

Beck:

Yeah. I really don't know how to play them very well, but I just sort of do my finger picking on it. I know two or three chords on it.

TE:

So what have the youngsters in Columbus offered you?

Beck:

One offered me a really big joint that had a silver tip on it. And another one offered me a hit of acid.

TE:

This is all within the last hour or so.

Beck:

It was within three minutes of each other. Very hospitable youth.

TE:

Yes. Kind. Kind, gentler.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

As you see, across the street we have the Ohio State University, largest campus in the world.

Beck:

Is it really?

TE:

School kids. Yeah. 50-60,000.

Beck:

Did you go there?

TE:

Mm-hmm I did. Both of us did. He quit when he got that piece of paper they gave him. Quit and went to Europe. He's been playing really, ever since.

Beck:

Yeah. What do you do with the jobs here?

TE:

I don't work at all right now. I've been traveling, playing, and I'm about to... I think I might move to Texas or something.

Beck:

Oh, really?

TE:

I kind of like it down there. I don't know what you thought of Austin at the time you-

Beck:

Austin's great.

TE:

You were there before South by Southwest, right? At one time.

Beck:

My roommate used to live there, so I went and hung out with him for a week. I had a good time. A lot of good people.

TE:

It just seems like there's a lot young songwriters that are telling stories and stuff, storyteller songs.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

Which is what I like to do the most.

Beck:

It's sort of the green part that sits... which is good. Close to New Orleans.

TE:

I've never been there. Did you guys go?

Beck:

I went there, yeah. Crazy. We were walking up Bourbon Street. There was a sort of frat karaoke bar. We walked by this bunch of jocks doing a karaoke to Loser.

TE:

No.

Beck:

They did. Yeah. I got really depressed for about three days.

JC:

You said-

TE:

There was a cover band in Austin doing it. Note for note.

Beck:

I have a tape. A friend of mine has a... I don't know if the the tape was fucked up, it might've been slow with the band…that had organ bass and lead guitar, and they did a version of it, and taped it on my mini cassette recorder. I'm going to put it on my next single.

TE:

The Beck tribute album, that should be out next year sometime.

Beck:

Yeah. But we changed it to Softy a long time ago.

TE:

So you changed Pay No Mind to Got No Mind.

Beck:

Got No Mind, yeah.

TE:

Is that a permanent change?

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

It's kind of evident, as the song starts, why you did that.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE

Beautiful. So how did that work? Who released the other... There's a whole bunch of songs released on... What's the label? Not Twin/Tone, but...

Beck:

Flipside?

TE:

Flipside.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

How'd that work?

Beck:

Well, I'd known them for years. I wanted to do an album with them for years, and I had stuff recorded on home tapes.

 

TE:

“Cut in Half Blues” and stuff?

Beck:

Yeah, stuff like that's on there. “Satan Gave Me a Taco.”

TE:

Right. That stuff all I got from you and James.

Beck:

Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And then I just never got the nerve up to ask them if they'd put out a record. So about a year ago I asked them, said, "Hey, would you put a record out?"

They said, "Yeah, sure.” I just thought, "Wow, I should've asked them two years ago." And so over the summer I did it, recorded a couple of country songs. Have you heard it?

TE:

Yeah.

Beck:

Put a couple of country songs on it.

TE:

Yeah, it was a beautiful 10-string on there, man.

Beck:

With the peddle steel. The peddle steel, yeah.

TE:

That's what I would like to see. I'd love to have a 10-string traveling.

Beck:

That guy played with Merle Haggard and Johnny Cash and George Jones.

TE:

It's really haunting.

Beck:

He's an old guy. Yeah.

TE:

He's really good. It was good timing too, for the album to come out.

Beck:

Well, it was supposed to come out last year, but we didn't get our shit together, so now it's coming out now.

TE:

It's good. It's got that... Like I was teasing you, it's like everybody now can get the other face of your music.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

It's a good time. But doesn't Geffen... What do they care? What do they think?

Beck:

That's why I signed with them, because-

TE:

Because they let you do what you want.

Beck:

They tried to sign me for about nine months. They started to try and sign me in May or June. Loser was sort of a big hit in L.A. college radio and stuff.

TE:

Right.

Beck:

And some commercial stations around the country started playing bootlegs of it and stuff, so they immediately smelled something. All these record companies were trying to-

TE:

They got good noses.

Beck:

Yeah. So I was kind of like, "No, I'm just going to do it on my own. I don't even want to subject myself to that world."

And so after a while they just sort of relented and said, "Okay, we'll give you anything you want.”  And then my only concern was, "Well, are you going to make me look like an asshole?”  They're like, "Of course not."

TE:

So you traded in all the, basically, the money for your complete control.

Beck:

Totally. Yeah.

TE:

Beautiful.

Beck:

So I had total control. It's cool there. There's three or four people. There's a couple of people there who used to work at SST n the evenings.

TE:

Right.

Beck:

And there's a couple of other people who are my age, who are young. One guy used to be in Girls Against Boys.

TE:

Uh-huh (affirmative). Yeah.

Beck:

So they sort of know what's going on. And it's a really small company. Warner Bros. puts like 300 albums out every three months, and they put out maybe 28 records a year.

TE:

They seem to have a pretty good family of stuff on their table.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

You've got Sonic Youth.

Beck:

Sonic Youth.

TE:

Sonic's on there.

Beck:

Doing whatever they want, pretty much.

TE:

Hey, what I'm wondering, you've got to put out 8-tracks, man. Demand they put out vinyl. Have them put out some 8-tracks.

Beck:

I'd like to put out some 78s. I actually found out a guy who still makes them.

TE:

That would be beautiful. A nice way to waste money.

Beck:

Yeah. I know some people that have 78s. I have a 78 player.

TE:

You do? What records you got on 78?

Beck:

I've got a Blind Willie Johnson. I've got a Barbecue Bob.

TE:

Oh wow. Have you heard Whiskey Biscuit at all?

Beck:

No, it sounds familiar though.

TE:

It's an L.A. band—signed with Geffen. We stayed at their house when we were there in L.A. They're pretty nice guys.

Beck:

Geffen's signing up piles of people.

TE:

Yeah. Maybe I ought to call them up.

Beck:

Yeah. It's worth... The only thing I can say to bands who get signed, open your door a little bit to the mainstream and the media and stuff, to be filtered and sort of re-sculptured to whatever likeness they want.

TE:

Who are you listening to nowadays?

Beck:

I'm sort of listening to the same old stuff. I like just a lot of little bands sort of. I'm really into Japanese noise.

TE:

Right.

Beck:

And Masana, stuff like that.

TE:

Oh yeah.

Beck:

I'm still into old stuff. I’m sort of been getting into Ramblin' Jack Elliott again lately. He's got a really... His voice is so expressive. I never realized it before.

TE:

Do you ever listen to Sonny Terry?

Beck:

So powerful. Oh yeah, totally. I'm pretty influenced by…my whole harmonic style is Sonny Terry. I get a lot of stuff now, now I have a little money. Whenever I do an in-store, I get free records, so I just go crazy.

TE:

Oh, that's good. Yeah, Mazzy Star came through town and did an in-store here.

Beck:

Oh yeah? They're great. I like them.

TE:

Yeah. I remember I got a tape from a friend when we were in Paris, and he was like, "Mazzy Star, Yo La Tengo, Daniel Johnson, yeah, they're good."

TE:

And I was like, "What?" I'd never heard of it. And I'd just got the tape. My friend sent it to me when we were in Paris. I remember Yo La Tengo and Mazzy Star.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

It sold out here. These guys were all there. I wasn't. I was still traveling.

Beck:

I'm friends with her niece.

TE:

Oh yeah? Is that the... who's the little girl that's on the banjo story tape, way back?

Beck:

That's my girlfriend at the time when I made that tape. That was my girlfriend's...

TE:

Kid?

Beck:

... kid. Yeah. Little girl. And I lost that tape. I wish I still had it.

TE:

Oh, I've got one.

Beck:

Well, I had a tape of stuff that I didn't even put on there. She's talking for about 45 minutes, going off. She just gave these sermons.

TE:

The thing about ghosts.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

You've got to have them.

Beck:

Crazy. Yeah. I'd like to get a copy of it.

TE:

I mean, I just have Banjo Story. I think maybe he gave it to me in France.

Beck:

Yeah, I don't even have it anymore.

TE:

There's a guy in this town, he's named Jason, and he made the same exact tape, styling and everything, same wrapper, so interesting. I was like, "Man, you guys are exactly alike. Exactly alike." By the time I was able to show him that, you were already coming on the radio and stuff.

TE:

He's like, "Wow."

Beck:

Yeah. What do you mean?(laughs)

TE:

Oh, man, I have his seven inch. I'll have to go dig it up. He's got a seven inch out. It's called the Hairy Patt Band. And they'd just be a great band for you to tour with right now.

Beck:

Yeah?

TE:

Great fucking sweet. Combination of just thrash, but it's acoustic. But he's got great lyrics, and a great Tom Waitsian voice.

Beck:

Who is this? What's his last name.

JC:

Drenik.

TE:

Drenik. Jason Drenik. I'll get the seven inch. I've got it at home. I'll give it to you.

Beck:

Okay.

TE:

The name of the band is Hairy Patt Band. I sent it to you in the mail and it came back. It came back about a half a year ago.

Beck:

Yeah. That's the thing, man. There's so much good shit out there. I just figure I'm out here making music too, what's the big deal? There's so much good shit. You know? It's sort of sick and evil to put so much attention on one person.

TE:

The public's focus is very limited.

Beck:

It's weird though. You know?

TE:

It gets microscopic for a while.

Beck:

It's really weird.

TE:

How's the writing coming along?

Beck:

Pretty good. I got a bunch of new stuff.

TE:

Will the band play any newer tunes tonight that no one's heard?

Beck:

Yeah, we got-

TE:

I mean, I know there won't be a lot of tunes, but-

Beck:

Yeah, we've got... About half the set is stuff that nobody's heard before.

TE:

Right. That's good.

Beck:

The stuff on Mellow Gold is so old, I don't really... I'm totally sick of the rap song. (“Loser”).

TE:

I still have the acoustic version of Fume, which is preferable to crank up to... The old tape I have for a long time. I haven't even heard the other version of it.

Beck:

Oh, you'll hear it tonight.

TE:

Yeah? Fume?

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

Good.

Beck:

Yeah. We've been doing it with the band. It's the rock version.

TE:

Cool.

Beck:

But it's really cool.

TE:

Because Got No Mind with the band was beautiful in Austin.

Beck:

Oh, you liked that?

TE:

Yeah. Beautiful. Especially when it sinks into that low E part.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

It's really good.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

So MTV Makes Me Want to Smoke Crack has been resurrected as a song?

Beck:

As a fusion jazz jam.

TE:

Oh, man.

Beck:

You've got to see it.

TE:

Beck, fusion, I think those two words have come together before.

Beck:

And I play Moog solo. I do a Moog solo.

TE:

Yeah?

Beck:

I refuse to do guitar solos, I only do Moog solos.

TE:

Gotcha. Oh, man.

Beck:

Fusion is the future.

TE:

But the words Beck and fusion have been used together somewhere before in history. I don't know, that could be dangerous.

Beck:

Yeah, I know.

TE:

It's like a new band from Sweden that has two guys and two girls in it. What's going to happen?

Beck:

Sweden. I'm going to move to Iceland and change my name to Bieck

TE:  (looking out window at the fans in line)

The alternatives are lining up.

Beck:

They are.

TE

I think they're going to be happy that there's two-

Beck:

It's weird, no punk rockers come to my shows.

TE

Just punk slackers.

Beck:

It's all slacker, rave, punk.

TE

A lot of frat boys though. I got to say, man.

Beck:

A lot of frat boys. Yeah.

TE:

I was surprised by that.

Beck:

I know. That’s…

TE:

Well, not surprised. I'm not surprised. It's completely logical.

Beck:

Sings “I'm a loser.” That song has been taken so amazingly out of context.

TE:

Is it haunting you or what?

Beck:

Totally.

TE:

I know-

Beck:

It's so out of context, it's amazing.

TE:

It's not included in your set, really, is it?

Beck:

Not really. We've done it, but I say I'm a like... I told you before, "I'm a softy, baby," which is crazy.

TE:

Beautiful. That's good. That's good. I mean, in Austin, someone came out and just went... and you did the first verse, and when you got to the chorus, you just went, "Ah, fuck it," and stopped. And it was great.

TE:

Oh, look, there's Jerry.   (Jerry Wick, lead singer of Gaunt)

TE:

You know, the scene, the punk scene in this town, there are... Have you heard of the New Bomb Turks, and Gaunt?

Beck:

I've heard of The New Bomb Turks, yeah.

TE:

Get the new Gaunt record. Steve Albini is... well, they're not going to tell anybody that he did it, because it's not important, but they're called Gaunt, and the drummer….one guitar player plays drums. He'll be playing drums for us tonight up at Stash's.

Beck:

Oh yeah?

TE:

My stuff isn't punk. But Gaunt is the complete tradition of... It's just fast, loud, and really good changes, and the songs are great. They're called Gaunt. They'll be out there sooner or later. They've already played there once with the New Bomb Turks. They're also from this town, but Gaunt is my preferred band of those two. They're great. It's traditional Buzzcockian punk coming at you.

Beck:

Right.

TE:

But it's definitely happening. And one guy, Jerry, the lead singer, a long time ago, I made a dub of the tape of yours, and he just... Going Nowhere Fast. He heard Washboard Joe and the bass player and I played Going Nowhere Fast.

Beck:

Right.

TE:

And that was a song he just liked, like, "Yeah, yeah, that song. That song." He wanted to hear it all the time. He was into it a lot. And now I saw that he owns a record company called Anyway Records, which is an all independent only, just seven inches. All kinds of thrash bands come out of there. Their ad, I saw it in the Chicago paper, it said, "Going Nowhere Fast?" And there's a picture of this guy leaning on a bar, all drunk. A drawing of the guy. Going nowhere fast is their motto for Anyway Records.

Beck:

Wow, that's hot.

TE:

Yeah. He'll be around her tonight.

Beck:

That's H-O-T-T.

TE:

He'll be around. He'll be around. But Gaunt.

Beck:

Gaunt.

TE:

Your good old one syllable punk name for you.

Beck:

Yeah.   Grrrrr.

TE:

Grunt.

Beck:

Beck. Gaunt. It's sort of liberating though that people think that Beck is a band.

TE:

Yeah. The owner of this... I'm sorry, the day manager, said, "Who are they anyways?" Great.

Beck:

Yeah, sort of a... You can talk about it in the third person. You can see it on a T-shirt, it doesn't bother you as much. Sort of like Wham!.

TE:

Is there going to be... When is the actual Beck cartoon going to start on Nickelodeon?

Beck:

There's not going to be a cartoon.

TE:

Damn.

Beck:

God help us. but up…the comic book company... You know the Rocks comics? You ever seen those? They have a Mötley Crüe comic.

TE:

Yes, and Kiss. The Kiss one I have at home. It's awesome.

Beck:

Those guys wanted to make one, a Beck one.

TE:

Really?

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

You know, I asked that question-

Beck:

I got too scared though. I got really scared.

TE:

Oh, I asked that question as a complete joke.

Beck:

No.

TE:

The Beck cartoon.

Beck:

It's already been offered. Everything you can think of, it's already happened. I got offered an opening spot on the DLR tour, David Lee Roth.

JC:

No.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

You've got to do that.

Beck:

No. It'd be funny for about five minutes.

TE:

Wait a minute. I don't understand how this world works.

Beck:

Although he is sort of an inspiration from my childhood.

TE:

Actually, I think that he actually... he's got your hairstyle now.

Beck:

Those jumps he did.

TE:

Yeah.

Beck:

The jumps, man, are just totally... [crosstalk]

TE:

Jump, he got a little bit-

Beck:

... awe inspiring.

TE:

Yeah.

Beck:

I tried to top some of his jumps in the video.

TE:

It worked.

JC:

[inaudible] being Hiawatha. I think he brought back breakdancing. Saw a lot of kids do that.

TE:

It was kind of Beck dancing is what it was. It was kind of kicking up some sand. It worked.

TE:

So how easygoing are the That Dog people?

Beck:

Really easygoing. Really cool.

TE:

Fun to travel with?

Beck:

Very fun. I wanted to take them along on a new tour. They’re telling me we can't go on the next tour together.

TE:

Is the next tour-

Beck:

... because it would be redundant.

TE:

Is the next tour America, or...

Beck:

Yeah. We're basically going to do bigger places.

TE:

Oh man, I got to hook you up with the Hairy Patt Band somehow, some way.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

I'll bring the seven inch back later. I'm going to see you in Chicago, because I'm going to go up there, play Friday, and then I'll see you Saturday. But this band, it's weird, because you were on Bong Load originally.

Beck:

Right. Yeah.

TE:

And they're on Bongwater, which is a New York company.

Beck:

Really? Anything to do with the band?

TE:

No. Well, it might be. What's the guy's name?

Beck:

Kramer.

TE:

Yeah. Kramer recorded them.

Beck:

Oh yeah?

TE:

Kramer brought them from New York.

Beck:

I'm a big Kramer fan. I always [crosstalk].

TE:

I got to hook you up with these guys, because they... I don't know how much pull you have to get an opening band.

Beck:

Totally. I have control.

TE:

Good.

Beck:

Should check them out. Yeah.

TE:

They're fucking great.

Beck:

This other band, Doo Rag, is going to come.

TE:

We opened up for them.

Beck:

Oh yeah?

TE:

We opened up for them in San Francisco.

Beck:

I really like them.

TE:

They're a lot of fun.  Dude was doing jumping jacks on the stage, and dancing around.

Beck:

Oh yeah?

Beck:

Pirate tactics.

TE:

Tactics with the Doo Rags.

Beck:

Because I'm totally down with the cardboard box. That was my original drums.

TE:

On the record it sounds just like an old record. You know?

Beck:

Totally.

TE:

They've got a different thing going. What do you think about the Washboard Joe for something.

Beck:

Totally. Got to come out.

TE:

We've got…

Beck:

Yeah, I just use a water brush and maraca, cycle it back.

JC:

It's a good busking instrument. Easton's always jealous because he's got a lug around his guitar.

BECK:

You just get the board.

JC:

I took the snare more sound.

Beck:

I busked for a while with a sax player playing cardboard box. That was really fun, just because you can just throw it away after you play.

JC:

Did you use sticks?

Beck:

Yeah, I used sticks.

TE:

That's all you need. Here comes Aqualung. Check this cat out. See the guy with the bald... no hair?

Beck:

Where?

TE:

Behind these guys. Here he comes. He's a got a beard. Right over here. He's coming this way.

Beck:

Yeah. Looks like he's from Lord of the Rings.

TE:

He’s a cat. He'll be down there tonight. He'll be down there front stage.

Beck:

Maybe I'll see That Dog.

TE:

Yeah. It's good to hear.

TE:

Any last thoughts for the children of Columbus?

Beck:

Yeah.

JC:

Keep eating corn.

TE:

You know that after this is over I’m just gonna give it to them, I'm just going to splice it so you're just saying, "Uh," the whole time.

Beck:

Uh. Uh. I deserve it.. Fill in the blanks. Be nice to your mom.

JC:

You had a good interview though…in that San Francisco-

Beck:

Steal all the cookies. Leave some for Jesus.

JC:

Oh, is it the Bay Garden?

Beck:

What's that?

JC:

I read an interview that you gave in San Francisco in the Bay Garden some wack shit on that.

Beck:

I try not to do that anymore, because people take it the wrong way.

TE:

No, but you also asked them, it's your job to delete the uhs and the ums. You also said that your guitar had the high E and the low E, but the songs you were going to play were the songs in between.

Beck:

Yeah.

TE:

Some of it works really well, and some the interviewer was like, "Okay, yeah."

Beck:

She was a very timid girl. Yeah.

TE:

She was just like, "Oh, okay."

Beck:

And I wasn't... Yeah. It wasn't supposed to be... I don't think that was supposed to be an article on me, it was just supposed to be an article on L.A. bands, but they turned it around.

JC:

A Beck piece.

TE:

Does Beck own a car?

Beck:

Yeah. I do.

TE:

What do you drive?

Beck:

I have a totally Beirut, shell-shocked Volvo '78.

TE:

Cool ride. Safe for the family though.

Beck:

Yeah, it's totally... A friend of mine found it. It was abandoned, totally vandalized.

TE:

Got it free?

No, I paid for it. It runs great. It looks like hell. But it's good. Keeps you honest.

JC:

So do you know Shane Blue?

Beck:

I met her, yeah.

JC:

You met her?

JC:

She's a pretty good writer.

Beck:

Yeah.

JC:

She had a violin player with her now. We played with them a couple of gigs, one up in…, or some Irish pub Molly Maguire.

TE:

No, Sidewalk.

Joe Ciriello:

Oh, Sidewalk Café in Venice. She's got a great voice.

Beck:

Is that her real name?

TE:

No. Bluestein or something.

Beck:

I like Bluestein. Great singer.

JC:

Yeah. Yeah, that's her thing, man. But she found that Volkswagen, man, she turned it into piece of shit she had. That was good story. Nice wagon.

JC:

It's a pity you can't get up to Stash's to play.

Beck:

Yeah.

JC:

I don't know, what are you guys going to do.

Beck:

If we finish early, I'll come check it out.

JC:

Where are you staying tonight?

Beck:

I don't know, but probably Comfort Inn.

TE:

Oh, wait, man, here's fucking blues sampler you can have. Live radio show with me and Bill Hangley, that guy I traveled across America with.

Beck:

Oh, excellent.

TE:

Just some shit. blues tunes. Because we didn't know each other. We met three minutes before we went on the air and we-

Beck:

Whoa, excellent.

JC:

Just played some shit.

Beck:

Yeah, I like this.

TE:

You guys coming in?

JC:

Yeah, what the hell.

TE:

It's about 11:45 the next morning. I'm surprised it's before noon. What a night. Oh, what a night. I remember back in '94. There's a fume in this truck. I don't know if we got …Anyways, it's Friday, April 8th, and it's time to go to Chicago. Ciao.

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